Author: Valerie Ross

Valerie Ross studied cognitive neuroscience and creative writing at Stanford University. While it was her fascination with understanding and explaining the mind and brain that first got her interested in science writing, Valerie has now written about everything from the neuroscience of memory to drug-resistant bacteria to general relativity. She has interned with Scientific American Mind, Discover, and Popular Mechanics.

Older and Wiser?

Older and Wiser?

New studies help explain why, despite having more experience, senior citizens often make unprofitable financial choices

By Valerie Ross | Posted November 18, 2010

Do Frequent Fliers Age More Slowly?

Do Frequent Fliers Age More Slowly?

According to Einstein’s theory of relativity, air travel and time travel are intertwined.

By Valerie Ross | Posted October 20, 2010

Diving for Drug Discovery

Diving for Drug Discovery

Pharmaceutical research is taking to the high seas

By Valerie Ross | Posted July 16, 2010

Swarm Mentality

Swarm Mentality

Following schools of fish and other animal collectives

By Ariel Bleicher Alyson Kenward and Valerie Ross | Posted June 9, 2010

Crickets Learn to Fear Spiders Before Birth

Crickets Learn to Fear Spiders Before Birth

Mother crickets forewarn offspring of predators before they hatch

By Valerie Ross | Posted March 31, 2010

Going Green Can Make You Mean

Going Green Can Make You Mean

The presence of green goods makes people kinder, but purchasing them gives people license to behave badly.

By Valerie Ross | Posted March 16, 2010

Reconstructing Hurricane History

Reconstructing Hurricane History

Scientists are using seismic data to track changes in hurricane patterns

By Valerie Ross | Posted February 23, 2010

Tackling Heart Trouble in the Developing World

Tackling Heart Trouble in the Developing World

A new pilot study suggests that pacemakers can be safely reused

By Valerie Ross | Posted February 14, 2010

What Makes Snot Turn Green?

What Makes Snot Turn Green?

We all do it, one time or another. You blow your nose for what must be the hundredth time that day. Before you throw out the tissue, you take a surreptitious glance inside. Rather than the usual clear or slight yellow, you see something different. Something green. Suddenly, your snot resembles the color palette of […]

By Valerie Ross | Posted February 1, 2010

Legacy of the Stone-Age Mind

Legacy of the Stone-Age Mind

Research suggests we remember better when we’re in survival mode

By Valerie Ross | Posted January 29, 2010

Can DNA Tests Reveal Nationality?

Can DNA Tests Reveal Nationality?

Scientists say no, but U.K. pilot program gathers data anyway

By Valerie Ross | Posted December 30, 2009

Forgotten Memories Linger in the Brain

Forgotten Memories Linger in the Brain

Your brain may remember something, even when you can’t

By Valerie Ross | Posted November 16, 2009

Sad Smokers Mean Happy Hearts

Sad Smokers Mean Happy Hearts

Smoking bans reduce heart attacks by over a third.

By Valerie Ross | Posted October 4, 2009