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The Black River and Lorain keep fighting

The Black River and Lorain keep fighting

EPA awards Lorain, Ohio, $15 million for Black River restoration

The fish had tumors. The Black River was poisoned. Thirty years ago, the Environmental Protection Agency declared this tributary of Lake Erie in northeast Ohio a bio-toxic ‘area of concern,’ an official designation that a region is unable to support wildlife because of human activity. This meant disaster for the city of Lorain, which sits on the edge of Lake Erie and is bisected by the Black River. Hit hard by the successive loss of two major industries — shipping in 1984 and a Ford plant in 2005 — the city of roughly 60,000 finally decided to ‘take back the Black.’ It has been a long, hard fight to save the river that runs through the heart of the city, but hope is in the air. More…

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