topicEnviro2

Butting heads over rhino horns

Butting heads over rhino horns

Conservationists are furious as South Africa moves to reinstitute domestic horn trade

The farm sweeps beyond the horizon, a patchwork of rich red earth, crisp grasses and the occasional green-yellow burst of savannah trees. In Klerksdorp, South Africa, a herd of more than 1,000 rhinos graze. Their famous horns are missing, blunted to mere nubs — a conspicuous sign of a ferocious battle gripping South Africa. Private rhino ranches like the one depicted in a recent National Geographic slideshow, serve as the backdrop for a raging conflict over the endangered animal’s prized horn. More…

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