We’re flushing energy down the toilet

But engineers are trying to reclaim it downstream

We’re flushing energy down the toilet

One kind of trash may yet yield treasure. Each person flushes dozens of pounds of toilet paper each year — and one team of researchers thinks that stinks. Rather than leaving it to gum up the plumbing, they propose harnessing the waste for low-carbon energy. While ExxonMobil has little to fear from this upstart, the reasonable prices of second-hand TP could position it as a viable alternative energy source, the researchers say.

Read More…

[comment]

environment

Clean-up chemical at the BP Oil Spill tied to health problems

Clean-up chemical at the BP Oil Spill tied to health problems

Scientists link a chemical frequently used to disperse spilled oil to wheezing, rashes and burning eyes in the recovery workers following the country’s largest-ever spill.

environment

PODCAST: Old beef

PODCAST: Old beef

The science of aging meat

Lyme bacteria settled in North America far earlier than we thought

Insight into the disease’s ancient origins points toward the causes of the current epidemic

environment

PODCAST: In herbs we trust

PODCAST: In herbs we trust

Neglected by the health care system, many immigrants are finding relief in medicinal herbs

Why fentanyl is the deadliest opioid in the country

And why the trend refuses to stop

environment

Tiny solar flares may explain the sun’s ridiculously hot atmosphere

The layers of the sun

New evidence suggests tiny solar flares heat the sun’s atmosphere to thousands of times the temperature of its surface.

Let’s talk about the latest godawful cybersecurity plan

A federal “hack-back” bill is in the news again. It might be good for vigilantes, but it’s definitely bad for the rest of us

social science

The frustrating quest to define consciousness

The frustrating quest to define consciousness

Never mind determining whether a robot can be conscious, we can’t even decide what the word means

Televised Debates: Insert Audience Response Here

The motivation for audiences to participate in presidential debates is more than just party fever