Read between the pines

What trees can tell us about nuclear disaster

Read between the pines

For the ancient Japanese, the significance of the pine tree was more than bark deep. Evergreens were thought to contain deities, a belief that spawned songs, plays and, more recently, the million-dollar effort to save a “miracle pine” that survived the 2011 earthquake and tsunami.

The revered trees are also a boon to scientific research on the environmental effects of radiation. A recently published study suggests Japanese red pines in the Fukushima Prefecture are plagued by physical abnormalities resulting from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant meltdown following the 2011 quake. The study is part of a growing body of research on the environmental effects of the Fukushima Daiichi catastrophe, much of which builds on previous findings following the Chernobyl disaster of 1986. Read More…

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environment

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environment

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environment

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environment

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social science

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