topicEnviro2

VIDEO: The brown dwarf hunter

VIDEO: The brown dwarf hunter

One astronomer thinks failed stars will help us understand the origins of celestial objects

Nobody is quite sure what brown dwarfs actually are. Too dim to be even considered stars but too bright to be classified as planets, astronomers often describe them as “failed stars” or “over-ambitious planets.”

These mysterious missing links cut to the heart of our ignorance of how celestial objects form. And they have become an obsession for Emily Rice, an astronomer at the CUNY College of Staten Island, who believes brown dwarfs may explain the origins of planets and stars and give us clues about life in the universe.

More…

articles blog
Preparations begin for the Great American Solar Eclipse

Preparations begin for the Great American Solar Eclipse

Get the most out of next year’s once-in-a-lifetime experience

World’s largest space telescope completed

World’s largest space telescope completed

Webb will unveil cosmic wonders we’ve never seen before

Don’t blame it on tonight’s super-supermoon

Don’t blame it on tonight’s super-supermoon

The real risk is for pseudoscience, not mood swings or tsunamis

Going the distance: How NASA launches spacecraft so far on so little

Going the distance: How NASA launches spacecraft so far on so little

Saturn orbiter Cassini traveled nearly 5 billion miles on less than four tons of fuel

Your smart speaker records you more often than you think

Your smart speaker records you more often than you think

And there’s no way for you to know when it will start

Why fungi adapt so well to life in space

Why fungi adapt so well to life in space

In many ways, these little microbes are better prepared for space travel than we are

Space has weather, too

Space has weather, too

Here’s how it affects you (and how we study it)