Author: Greg Uyeno

Greg Uyeno was born and raised in the penumbra of the University of California, Berkeley, from which he received a B.A. in cognitive science with an emphasis in linguistics. Since transplanted to New York, he’s taken to local pastimes, like speed walking and standing around waiting. Greg also enjoys home cooking, playing ‘ukulele, and doing things with words.

|para|tech

|para|tech

The technology behind the Paralympic Games

By Ryan F. Mandelbaum Greg Uyeno Kelsey Kennedy and Knvul Sheikh | Posted September 6, 2016

The original ant farms

The original ant farms

The remarkable leafcutter ant is spurring some wild ideas about agriculture, medicine and the nature of ecosystems

By Greg Uyeno | Posted July 6, 2016

The Circle Constant

The Circle Constant

Or what’s the matter with π

By Greg Uyeno | Posted June 27, 2016

A wake-up call

A wake-up call

City birds in a new light

By Greg Uyeno | Posted May 9, 2016

No first language

No first language

Gita Martohardjono’s own language story guides her research

By Greg Uyeno | Posted April 11, 2016

What is CRISPR, anyway?

What is CRISPR, anyway?

Something primordial is shaping the future of biology

By Greg Uyeno | Posted February 14, 2016

PODCAST: Potato Potato, episode 1

PODCAST: Potato Potato, episode 1

With Nisse Greenberg and Dan Duncan

By Greg Uyeno | Posted February 8, 2016

VIDEO: Is a hot dog a sandwich?

VIDEO: Is a hot dog a sandwich?

What a divisive food argument can teach us about psychology

By Greg Uyeno | Posted January 31, 2016

Allele vs. Predator

Allele vs. Predator

Minor gene changes have major consequences for an ecosystem

By Greg Uyeno | Posted January 23, 2016

Seeing through the eyes of an expert

Seeing through the eyes of an expert

What can we learn from the way experts see the world?

By Greg Uyeno | Posted January 2, 2016

“The Food Lab” brings science into the home kitchen

“The Food Lab” brings science into the home kitchen

And the home cook to science

By Greg Uyeno | Posted December 18, 2015

Turning criminals’ own words against them

Turning criminals’ own words against them

Anything you say – or write – may be used against you in a court of law

By Greg Uyeno | Posted November 3, 2015