Author: Meghan Bartels

Meghan Bartels graduated from Georgetown University with a major in classics and a minor in biology. After college, she worked at a small environmental book publisher, where she learned that writing about science is fun when you get to use sentences that include both nouns and verbs. She also enjoys learning about history, drinking tea, and cheering on the Georgetown men’s basketball team.

Fenced in, fenced out

Fenced in, fenced out

The largest stand of American elms is just out of reach in the heart of the city

By Meghan Bartels | Posted September 19, 2016

The city limits of the Paralympics

The city limits of the Paralympics

Navigating the host city remains challenging after Games

By Meghan Bartels | Posted September 6, 2016

Fishing for DNA

Fishing for DNA

A genetic technique offers new perspective on life in New York City’s rivers

By Meghan Bartels | Posted August 1, 2016

Watching the clouds go by

Watching the clouds go by

And modeling what they may do next

By Meghan Bartels | Posted June 20, 2016

VIDEO: The science of game design

VIDEO: The science of game design

How to know when to hold an idea and when to fold it

By Meghan Bartels | Posted

Protecting wildlife in the thick of it

Protecting wildlife in the thick of it

$100 million refuge proposed to shelter iconic rabbits and other thicket species

By Meghan Bartels | Posted April 18, 2016

A city-wide web

A city-wide web

New network aims to provide free Wi-Fi across New York City

By Meghan Bartels | Posted April 11, 2016

There’s fungus in your food

There’s fungus in your food

A whole kingdom to thank for more than just mushrooms

By Meghan Bartels | Posted April 4, 2016

Putting plastic pollution in the bag

Putting plastic pollution in the bag

New York City should put a price on single-use bags

By Meghan Bartels | Posted March 28, 2016

The surprising history of π

The surprising history of π

Actually, it’s not all that Greek to me

By Meghan Bartels | Posted March 14, 2016

Putting names to bones

Putting names to bones

The art and science of identifying famous people from the past

By Meghan Bartels | Posted March 7, 2016

Reaching for the stars

Reaching for the stars

Astronomer uses stellar forensics to understand giant explosions in space

By Meghan Bartels | Posted February 19, 2016

PODCAST: A Sense of Place digs into the Venetian lagoon

PODCAST: A Sense of Place digs into the Venetian lagoon

How water and forest combined to build a city

By Meghan Bartels | Posted February 8, 2016

VIDEO: Is a hot dog a sandwich?

VIDEO: Is a hot dog a sandwich?

What a divisive food argument can teach us about psychology

By Meghan Bartels | Posted January 31, 2016

Going viral

Going viral

Scientists are exploring a hidden side of the microbiome with hopes for patient benefits

By Meghan Bartels | Posted January 23, 2016

INFOGRAPHIC: Managing lower back pain

Prevalent yet difficult to treat

By Meghan Bartels | Posted January 3, 2016

Two rare bees pass first hurdle for federal protection

Two rare bees pass first hurdle for federal protection

Bee-lovers race against population declines and bureaucracy

By Meghan Bartels | Posted December 23, 2015

Finding beauty in the clouds

Finding beauty in the clouds

Artist’s new book explores human experience of weather

By Meghan Bartels | Posted December 6, 2015

Why salmonella is so hard to beat

Why salmonella is so hard to beat

New food safety rules emphasize active prevention but face steep challenges

By Meghan Bartels | Posted November 27, 2015

Seafloor communities create electricity

Seafloor communities create electricity

In the digital age, we’re all connected by electricity — and some microbes are too

By Meghan Bartels | Posted November 18, 2015

A chef’s handiwork may convince kids to eat their veggies, study suggests

A chef’s handiwork may convince kids to eat their veggies, study suggests

But a gourmet touch may not be in reach of all schools

By Meghan Bartels | Posted November 12, 2015

Ig Nobels fail to bring a key field to view

Ig Nobels fail to bring a key field to view

Missing microbes on science’s goofiest day

By Meghan Bartels | Posted September 22, 2015